Posts Tagged: art

The King and the Little Man: K.G. Subramanyan’s Illustrated Fable About How Power Blinds Us to Reality

A gentle prod to remember the “forgotten song”, in a world filled with noise.   K.G. Subramanyan was one of the most diverse artists of his time, traversing an entire breadth of human engagements through his work – from scholarly forays in academics, to the child-like crafting of picture books. In his collection of witty and satirical children’s books, the self-proclaimed…read more

Drawing to Remember: The Gift of Pause and the Benefits of Keeping a Sketchbook

The elusive illustrator-urbanist behind “Of Ink and Yellow Memories,” Neelakshi Rathore, discusses the inward versus outward worlds of a creative.    Most people start out drawing by copying things. Or they draw things as they appear before them. But for Neelakshi Rathore, things became really interesting when she began to draw things as she remembered them – when she could see a place that she…read more

Door in the Wall: How Art is Redefining Therapy for the Differently Abled

How traditional societies understood the therapeutic role of art, and what educators and therapists today can achieve with it.   “Art for art’s sake” is the famous translation of a French slogan that saw art as being an autonomous thing that has no other purpose or aim but to be for itself. Philosopher Alain de Botton…read more

Raw Art: Writer Esther David on the Usefulness of Art as Therapy

In conversation with the Sahitya Akademi awardee on her explorations with untutored artists in prisons, slums and hospitals of Ahmedabad.   Art can often express what language cannot. A previous article had explored how our constant under-estimation of art is critically threatening our potential to become more ‘complete human beings’. In this light, it was inspiring…read more

What India’s Stepwells Tell Us About History’s Forgotten Feminine

On the connection between water and women, as conveyed by the architectural marvels of Gujarat.   In the book ‘The Alphabet Versus the Goddess’, Leonard Shlain eloquently argues that the worship of the goddess was a ubiquitous ancient phenomenon world-over, and that male gods rose quite suddenly to usurp their thrones. The book strongly makes a case for…read more